Locations in Orlando

22 results

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  • Agave Azul

    5855 Winter Garden Vineland Road, Windermere Dr. Phillips

    407-395-8350

    Family owned and operated, established in 1998. Voted #1 Best Mexican Restaurant 2019 Orlando Weekly.
  • Agave Azul Winter Springs

    5248 Red Bug Lake Road, Winter Springs North

    407-636-3600

    Family owned and operated, established in 1998. Voted #1 Best Mexican Restaurant Orlando Weekly 2019. UberEats and Doordash delivery available.
  • Barnie's CoffeeKitchen

    118 S. Park Ave. Winter Park Area

    407-629-0042

    2 articles
  • Bola Ristorante

    8148 International Drive West Orlando

    (407) 345-8936; (407) 345-8884 (FAX)

    The Urban Chic Expereince like none you have ever had before. The mood is neo-soul, it's trendy, stylish, and chic. Come to experience it yourself.
  • Bosendorfer Lounge, Grand Bohemian Hotel

    325 S. Orange Ave. Winter Park Area

    (407) 313-9000

  • Café Linger

    2912 Edgewater Drive College Park

    352-895-0566

    Café Linger brings classic European cooking techniques to modern breakfast, brunch and lunch dishes. During the crisis, we keep you and your loved ones safe by offering limited-contact curbside pickup, delivery directly through us, or UberEats and Postmates.
    3 articles
  • Dexter's of Thornton Park

    808 E. Washington St. Thornton Park

    (407) 648-2777

    With an attractive wait staff, eclectic art and 30-plus wines and champagnes, Dexter's makes you feel cool even if you're not. The unique selection of international beers is popular at this wine bar and café; the concrete floor means it can get noisy as hell.
    2 articles
  • Downtown Credo Coffee

    706 W. Smith Street College Park

    407-250-4888

    A satisfying dark-roasted brew works well in expresso  drinks (lattes, macchiato, cappuccino) and as  a straight-up drip coffee is served in a room as simple and satisfying as the menu, with clean lines, comfortable modern furniture and just enough embellishment to make the space appealing. The pay-what-you-will model is intriguing; we hope it works out for them.

    7 articles
  • Drunken Monkey Coffee Bar

    444 N. Bumby Ave. Milk District

    407-893-4994

    Homemade soups, wraps, panini, baked goods, all day breakfast, kombucha, coffee, espresso drinks, teas and smoothies. Many vegan and gluten free options available. Dining room and drive through are open for take-out orders.
    4 articles
  • Emack & Bolio's

    5800 Universal Blvd., in Hard Rock Hotel West Orlando

    (407) 503-2432

    Remember all those rock songs you liked so much you just wanted to eat them up? Well, now's your chance. Emack & Bolio's is like eating rock & roll at its finest.

    The company story: Amid the blazing rock & roll scene of the late '70s, Bobby Rook, an entertainment attorney cum ice cream enthusiast in Boston, creates a place to entertain rock stars after hours. They're hanging out, get the munchies, Bobby Rook makes some far-out flavors, and next thing you know he's known as Boston's ice cream man. The demand for his ice cream reaches record proportions, so he decides to open a store, but doesn't know what to call it.

    "Name it after us," say Mr. Emack and Mr. Bolio, homeless men that he's done some pro bono work for. They live in the alleyway behind his store.

    And thus, the first premium ice cream shop named after homeless men is born: Emack & Bolio's.

    The Hard Rock Hotel location has very little grassroots flavor left in it. It is a big, flashy store with characteristic Hard Rock paraphernalia lining the walls and colorful, kitschy signs announcing the flavors. There are no homeless men anywhere to be seen. But the ice cream is still the same premium, homemade concoction, and it's really good. Not only that, but it's made from hormone-free milk.

    "I'll take the Twisted Dee-Light," I said, remembering the time I asked my mom to take me to the Glendale Galleria to buy the new Twisted Sister album. I was handed an enormous scoop of chocolate ice cream laced with fudge chunks and brownies ($3.25 for one scoop); the creation of which was the brainchild of Dee Snider of Twisted Sister, the same man who brought us "I Wanna Rock!"

    Deep Purple Cow is black raspberry ice cream with blueberries and black and white chocolate chips. Delicious. The signature Strawberry Fields Forever is like popping ripe berries and cream in your mouth. The lemon sorbet, We Call It Mellow Yellow, was perfectly balanced, sweet and tart.

    Pistachio Ga Ga, neither cloying nor green, had real nuts. Crunch Control to Major Tom (my winner for the best flavor name ever) was good though its description was convoluted: vanilla ice cream, caramel swirl, chocolate crumbs, chocolate chips, nuts and cookies.

    Emack & Bolio's also serves sundaes with homemade hot fudge, a banana split called Bolio's Banana Submarine ($6.25), ice cream floats and smoothies.

    Two pieces of advice: Don't be turned off by the parking situation; they validate. And do share. The portions are huge.

  • FUMA Cigar and Hookah Lounge

    5281 W. Irlo Bronson Memorial Highway Kissimmee

    407-479-9842

    Relax and mingle in the comfortable lounge-style atmosphere.
  • Infusion Tea

    1600 Edgewater Drive College Park

    407-999-5255

    Sitting at Infusion Tea on Edgewater Drive, sipping Assam black tea ($2) and munching on delicious vegetarian hummus ($6), I reflect on what this place has in common with my favorite hot dog counter in the East Village: They are both what sociologist Ray Oldenburg calls "Third Places." Naturally the First Place is home; the second is work (damn). Third Places are the gems, providing us the precious community we so often lack in our lives.

    I went to Infusion for the third time in four days last night. I met up with a friend I hadn't seen in a while, and we closed ourselves off to the outside world to concern ourselves only with conversation and the vast menu of tea before us. Suddenly the choice of black, oolong, white, green or herbal seemed the most important thing in the world. Jasmine pearls? Or monkey-picked oolong?

    Some places can just sweep you off your overworked and/or bored-at-home feet, and Infusion has the charm to do it. The quaint corner spot in a little retro building on Edgewater begs you to bike over and stay for hours. Owner Christina Cowherd is interesting and kind, and has created a special atmosphere where visiting and lingering reign over efficiency and the bottom line. She and her husband, Brad, got the idea to open Infusion Tea while in the Peace Corps in Guatemala, and moved back to College Park to be near their families and down the street from their alma mater, Edgewater High School. Incorporating into their business many of the lifestyle changes they learned in Guatemala, they are avid recyclers, conscientious organic-food buyers and dedicated composters. Among their fantastic food choices are banana bread ($1.75) and gazpacho ($5) – recipes that Christina created with her Guatemalan students – and delightful organic tea-time bites such as scones ($1.75) with fresh cream and jam (add 75 cents).

    I couldn't help but ask about their goal in opening the tea shop. "This may sound hokey," Christina said, "but I read this book called Great Good Places by Ray Oldenburg …"

    "The one about Third Places?" I asked.

    "That was my primary goal," she said.

    Doesn't sound hokey to me at all. In fact, I'm happy to switch my affection from all-beef kosher dogs to Assam tea when it provides me with something nourishing that I crave: community.

    6 articles
  • La Creperia Cafe

    9101 International Drive, Suite 1144, Pointe Orlando West Orlando

    (407) 370-0008

    Amid a bustle of pre- and post-pubescent mallrats, a Greek man is boldly bringing a French delicacy to the masses. Some say they're wussy pancakes; some say ça c'est bon, but either way you flip it, crepes are a street-food staple and Konstantinos Chilias, aka chef Dino, is griddling at the chance to find converts in the Sunshine State. Sure, a food court isn't the most likely place to find a creperie, but when you think about it, it makes sense. Indoor street fare is essentially what food courts serve up, and Dino's brand of delicate made-to-order flappe-jacques are worthy of a traipse into the Orlando Fashion Square Mall fray.

    Leafing through the menu, I was struck at the number of sweet and savory crepes ' nearly 70 are offered. Even by Parisian standards, that's an impressive amount, but what really impresses is that quality doesn't suffer as a result. 'Mall foodâ?� and 'qualityâ?� are often thought of as being mutually exclusive, but the friendly Grecian is doing his part to alter that perception one gourmet crepe at a time.

    Ushering in this new era in food-court dining has taken chef Dino halfway 'round the globe, from humble beginnings hawking crepes on the thoroughfares of Paris in the early 1980s to owning and operating cafés on the Greek isle of Rhodes, in Long Beach, Calif., and, most recently, in Ybor City. Odd he would choose a mall in Orlando as his next conquest, though he admits his ultimate plan is to open a storefront café downtown or in Winter Park.

    Yearning for a light meal on my initial visit, I opted for 'La Creperie Special� ($8.25), a creamy mélange of mushrooms, spinach, tomatoes, green peppers and caramelized onions enveloped by a slightly crisp whole-wheat crepe. Every fromage-filled bite satisfied, accompanied with Dino's fresh-squeezed, though lip-pursingly sour, lemonade ($3.75), and I couldn't help but feel sorry for the folks lining up at Sbarro and JJ's Cajun.

    Vegetarians can have a field day here, no doubt, but I have to say I enjoyed the chicken-filled 'La Parisâ?� ($8.25) even more; it balanced perfectly the flavors of feta, spinach and roasted red peppers. On another visit, I sampled the 'turkey a la brieâ?� ($7.50), which proved to be my favorite. Layered with square slivers of turkey, diced tomato and gooey brie, the dish is made magnifique by Dino's secret cream sauce.

    It took me awhile to decide on a sweet crepe, but I eventually settled on the 'Marie Antoinetteâ?� ($7.25) with Nutella, banana, strawberries and Baileys liqueur. The batter, made with fine baker's flour, is properly brushed around a hotplate, resulting in a light, ultra-thin pancake. Watching the cook prepare my indulgence, I noticed the bananas he used were overripe, the peel nearly black. Then walnuts were sprinkled into my crepe, after which I realized they weren't making a Marie Antoinette at all. What I got instead was a decent enough sweet crepe, but the miscue brought to light some of the service deficiencies apparent when Dino isn't present (usually on weekends). The staff, sans Dino, can get a bit out of sorts when serving two or more customers at a time; on this occasion they mixed up my order, forgot the 'Berry Appealingâ?� smoothie ($4) I ordered and forgot to charge me for dessert.

    On another visit, Dino himself prepared the classic crepes suzette (known here as 'Madame Suzette,� $7.75), and though a flambé failed to materialize, the crepe was everything I hoped it would be: a buttered and sugared crepe drizzled with Grand Marnier, splashed with fresh lemon and orange juice, folded into a triangle and drizzled with more Grand Marnier.

    Since the demise of Maison des Crepes in Winter Park, crepeheads haven't had a venue in which to satisfy their cravings. But chef Dino is as determined as King Leonidas to change that, and I wouldn't be surprised to see one of his stand-alone creperies open in town sooner than later.

    But for now, we dine in (mall) hell.

  • Nile Ethiopian Restaurant

    7048 International Drive I-Drive/Universal

    407-354-0026

    Orlando’s lone Ethiopian restaurant is a blessing for foodies with an appetite for the exotic. Utensils come in the form of pancake-like sourdough bread called injera, used to scoop intensely spiced dishes from a large communal platter. Be sure to sample traditional honey wine as well as Ethiopian coffee, brewed in a clay pot.
  • Orlando Cat Cafe

    532 Cagan Park Ave., Clermont West Orlando

    352-989-4820

    Do you like cats? Do you like coffee? Then you’ve found the purr-fect place! The Orlando Cat Cafe is a cozy coffeehouse where (for a small entry fee) you can enjoy a delicious cup of Minch coffee in the Cat Play/Adoption Area where you will be greeted by cats and kitties, all of which are available for adoption. We are the first Cat Cafe to open in the State of Florida!
    1 event 1 article
  • Orlando Island Oasis

    2716 N. Forsyth Road Winter Park Area

    (407) 657-6047

    Cold beer, good food, and fun, fun, fun.
  • P Is For Pie Bake Shop

    2806 Corrine Drive Audubon Park

    407-745-4743

    2 articles
  • Redlight Redlight

    2810 Corrine Drive Audubon Park

    407-893-9832

    If Orlando was famous for something other than Mickey Mouse, it’d be Redlight Redlight. Their exhaustive beer list and impeccable taste make it tempting to take up residence on a barstool in the much bigger space they now inhabit in Audubon Park. Plus, as of 2014, they have begun brewing and serving their own independent craft beers.
    3 events 22 articles
  • Sleeping Moon Cafe

    495 N. Semoran Blvd. Winter Park Area

    321-972-8982

    Boho coffeehouse perks up the Aloma/Semoran corridor with bold brews, live music and a colorful aesthetic. Soups, salads and sandwiches comprise the menu offerings; butternut squash and tomato-lentil soups are spot-on, while sandwiches can be hit ("roast beef yum") or miss ("Tofurkey Day"). To end, the chocolate trilogy provides another caffeine fix. Closed Sundays.

  • Stardust Video and Coffee

    1842 E. Winter Park Road Audubon Park

    407-623-3393

    Stardust started life as a video rental place that served coffee and over the years has morphed to serve the changing desires of the community. Among its many functions (work and study spot, café, live music venue, market host) and despite its ramshackle air, the ’dust is prized by anyone looking for a quality buzz. The bartenders of the Slanted and Enchanted Bar (in the big room) are given free rein to come up with inventive craft cocktails; the Scotch Bar (in the smaller room) stocks exquisite bottles; and the bottled beer and cider selection is choice. For many, it’s a home away from home.
    10 events 81 articles
  • This N That Eats

    1811 N Orange Ave Central

    407-757-0810

    1 article
  • World Market

    1744 Sand Lake Road South

    (407) 240-2064

    The first time, I went along reluctantly – perhaps I even threw something that was kind of like a tantrum. I sat in the back seat, sighing the whole way, wondering why my friends were dragging me to yet another import store. I didn't need any cheap rugs, handmade baskets or scented candles, I silently screamed.

    We finally pulled up to a shopping center and parked and walked across the lot, and I noticed a Michael's craft store and a Ross Dress for Less and braced myself for Pier One, the sequel. Sure enough, the smell of wicker greeted us at the door. My friends scattered to the various housewares and furniture aisles, leaving me to take stock; I decided to take one quick stroll around the store. A moment later, I found myself in the back of World Market, excited as a child in Toys "R" Us in December. What had changed my outlook? Aisles (and aisles) of specialty foods, of course.

    First, I came face to face with a row of colorful candy, but that alone wasn't enough to woo me. What really made me giddy was a very particular kind of candy, one that has become a family tradition – Coffee Crisp. My relatives carry cases of this chocolate-covered wafer filled with coffee cream back from each journey to Canada. I would be disowned if I even went close to Niagara Falls and came back empty-handed. And here I was, in front of a shelf full of boxes of Coffee Crisps, and I wouldn't have to hide them from a customs officer after I bought them.

    I was thinking up other hard-to-find specialties, and I raced up and down the aisles trying to find them – amaretti cookies? Check. Mango chutney? Check. French lemonade? Pull out the glasses.

    For those looking to stock their pantries with out-of-the-ordinary condiments and sauces, as well as snacks, cookies, spices and beverages, World Market is an absolute must.

    When I finally met up with my friends in the checkout line, they were holding beach mats and cards, wind chimes and glassware. Their baskets were full, but mine was overflowing.

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