Steakhouse in Orlando

Clear Filters
Loading...
2 results

    Shakespeare's Juliet pondered, "What's in a name?" Obviously Juliet wasn't in the restaurant business, because names seem to be of primary concern to those vying for dining dollars.

    Because of a lawsuit brought by an out-of-town claimant, Wildfires Bar 'n' Grill in Thornton Park recently changed its name to Wildsides. And just as we were wiping our mouths at Woodstone Grill, we found, because of litigation brought by nearby Stonewood Tavern, the Sand Lake Italian eatery was to be rechristened as Vines Grille.

    Because of a lawsuit brought by an out-of-town claimant, Wildfires Bar 'n' Grill in Thornton Park recently changed its name to Wildsides. And just as we were wiping our mouths at Woodstone Grill, we found, because of litigation brought by nearby Stonewood Tavern, the Sand Lake Italian eatery was to be rechristened as Vines Grille.

    In an area dominated by high-concept restaurant giants, Vines is surprisingly cozy, an intimate space with probably no more than two dozen tables. Several of them overlook the open kitchen and its large charcoal-fired grill, a rotisserie filled with crispy chickens slowly revolving above it. The former tenant, Stallone's, used the grill and ovens for brick-oven pizza and casual specialties, while Vines goes the more high-end route, offering a full menu of steaks and seafood.

    In an area dominated by high-concept restaurant giants, Vines is surprisingly cozy, an intimate space with probably no more than two dozen tables. Several of them overlook the open kitchen and its large charcoal-fired grill, a rotisserie filled with crispy chickens slowly revolving above it. The former tenant, Stallone's, used the grill and ovens for brick-oven pizza and casual specialties, while Vines goes the more high-end route, offering a full menu of steaks and seafood.

    The meal began with an enormous, beautiful platter of roasted mussels ($9.50), the broth spiced with shreds of still-crunchy red pepper. Vines' substitute for pizza is flatbread. My order of the garlic shrimp variety ($9.50) looked wonderful, the thin bread nicely charred from the oven, with spicy tomato sauce and a few well-placed jumbo shrimp atop. But the center of the bread was soggy and limp, impossible to pick up by hand.

    The meal began with an enormous, beautiful platter of roasted mussels ($9.50), the broth spiced with shreds of still-crunchy red pepper. Vines' substitute for pizza is flatbread. My order of the garlic shrimp variety ($9.50) looked wonderful, the thin bread nicely charred from the oven, with spicy tomato sauce and a few well-placed jumbo shrimp atop. But the center of the bread was soggy and limp, impossible to pick up by hand.

    No faults could be found in the twin tenderloin entree ($22.50), two succulent and immaculately cooked bacon-wrapped steaks dressed with wine-soaked mushrooms.

    No faults could be found in the twin tenderloin entree ($22.50), two succulent and immaculately cooked bacon-wrapped steaks dressed with wine-soaked mushrooms.

    The young Vines is a restaurant of appearances, like the flatbread -- beautiful to look at, but not yet past the soggy middle stage.

    The young Vines is a restaurant of appearances, like the flatbread -- beautiful to look at, but not yet past the soggy middle stage.

    One of my favorite New York restaurants is a place called Peasant, which features chicken slow-roasted in a charcoal oven, and the sight of those birds at Vines made my mouth water in remembered anticipation. This free-range bird ($16.50) turned out to be a bit dry, even though the deep flavors were perfect. The rice accompaniment listed in the menu was mysteriously replaced by rosemary mashed potatoes; since I had also ordered the mashed potatoes as an a la carte side, I wish the overworked waiter had caught the duplication.

    One of my favorite New York restaurants is a place called Peasant, which features chicken slow-roasted in a charcoal oven, and the sight of those birds at Vines made my mouth water in remembered anticipation. This free-range bird ($16.50) turned out to be a bit dry, even though the deep flavors were perfect. The rice accompaniment listed in the menu was mysteriously replaced by rosemary mashed potatoes; since I had also ordered the mashed potatoes as an a la carte side, I wish the overworked waiter had caught the duplication.

    While outgoing and attentive when they got a chance, only two waiters were on that night, and the demand got away from them at times. I think delays in service accounted for a lot of the faults.

    While outgoing and attentive when they got a chance, only two waiters were on that night, and the demand got away from them at times. I think delays in service accounted for a lot of the faults.

    This is a good space, and I hope that the potentially great food will get Vines through the opening jitters.

    You like thick slabs of meat? You like a room full of dark wood, tuxedo-clad waiters and a wine list that looks like a small phone book? Then you will like Vito's Chop House.

    From the folks who brought us Fish Bones Restaurant comes Vito's, a re-creation of an old-fashion New York steakhouse. Over-the-top elegance is the game here, from gigantic portions to ultra-attentive waiters to the decor, which packs wine bottles into every spare millimeter of the main dinning room.

    From the folks who brought us Fish Bones Restaurant comes Vito's, a re-creation of an old-fashion New York steakhouse. Over-the-top elegance is the game here, from gigantic portions to ultra-attentive waiters to the decor, which packs wine bottles into every spare millimeter of the main dinning room.

    As seafood plays a strong second to red meat at Vito's, my friend and I started with "cold seafood antipasto" ($29.95). Ludicrously served in multiple trays of ice stacked 3 feet high (like a wedding cake), this was a delicious, if overpriced, appetizer. The chilled oysters, clams, New Zealand mussels, jumbo shrimp and Maine lobster were succulent and first-rate, but the $30 price tag was as excessive as the presentation. It effectively blocked all eye contact with the other side of the table. This dish should be served on one tray and the price cut by a third.

    As seafood plays a strong second to red meat at Vito's, my friend and I started with "cold seafood antipasto" ($29.95). Ludicrously served in multiple trays of ice stacked 3 feet high (like a wedding cake), this was a delicious, if overpriced, appetizer. The chilled oysters, clams, New Zealand mussels, jumbo shrimp and Maine lobster were succulent and first-rate, but the $30 price tag was as excessive as the presentation. It effectively blocked all eye contact with the other side of the table. This dish should be served on one tray and the price cut by a third.

    To help decide entree meats, our waitress presented a tray of thick, raw steaks wrapped in cellophane and proceeded to explain the various cuts. The show and tell was a nice touch. Fortified with knowledge, we ordered a 24-ounce prime rib-eye ($22.95) and a 24-ounce porterhouse veal chop ($22.95). According to the menu, Vito's grills meat very hot and fast over orange, oak and mystique woods. With cuts often 2 inches thick, this is the perfect place to order a steak "Pittsburgh blue" (seared on the outside, cool blue and raw on the inside). But not being into the raw-beef thing, we opted instead for medium-rare on both cuts.

    To help decide entree meats, our waitress presented a tray of thick, raw steaks wrapped in cellophane and proceeded to explain the various cuts. The show and tell was a nice touch. Fortified with knowledge, we ordered a 24-ounce prime rib-eye ($22.95) and a 24-ounce porterhouse veal chop ($22.95). According to the menu, Vito's grills meat very hot and fast over orange, oak and mystique woods. With cuts often 2 inches thick, this is the perfect place to order a steak "Pittsburgh blue" (seared on the outside, cool blue and raw on the inside). But not being into the raw-beef thing, we opted instead for medium-rare on both cuts.

    The meat was served alone, glistening and sizzling atop a gleaming white plate. The steaks were huge, covered most of the plates, suggesting not just dinner but some lower species freshly conquered and killed by the kitchen staff.

    The meat was served alone, glistening and sizzling atop a gleaming white plate. The steaks were huge, covered most of the plates, suggesting not just dinner but some lower species freshly conquered and killed by the kitchen staff.

    Being well-marbled, the selections had spectacular flavor. Silence fell over our table as my friend and I descended into unrestrained protein lust. Eating meat at Vito's will make you feel like a caveman (or a stockbroker).

    Being well-marbled, the selections had spectacular flavor. Silence fell over our table as my friend and I descended into unrestrained protein lust. Eating meat at Vito's will make you feel like a caveman (or a stockbroker).

    An excellent salad and wonderful bread comes with every entree, but vegetables are an optional side, ranging from a giant baked potato ($2.50) to a medley of oak-grilled vegetables ($5.95).

    An excellent salad and wonderful bread comes with every entree, but vegetables are an optional side, ranging from a giant baked potato ($2.50) to a medley of oak-grilled vegetables ($5.95).

    The dessert tray offered more ridiculously huge choices. We went for the "peanut butter explosion" and a house special "grilled peach D'Vito" (each $8.95). The "explosion" should have been called "wall o' peanut butter." This monstrous slab was too dense for us to tackle without a gallon of milk and several sugar-starved teen-agers. The "peach D'Vito" was a similarly sized but glorious mix of grilled peach chunks, cinnamon, flavored whip cream, ice cream and liquors. We demolished this sweet treat down to the last drop. It should not be missed.

Calendar

Newsletters

Never miss a beat

Sign Up Now

Subscribe now to get the latest news delivered right to your inbox.

© 2019 Orlando Weekly

Website powered by Foundation