Japanese/Sushi in Orlando

Clear Filters
Loading...
15 results

    As mainstream tastes grow more adventurous, perhaps it was inevitable that a swanky sushi restaurant would arrive on east Aloma Avenue, next door to a bowling alley.

    Despite sounding like a play on the word "psycho", Saikyo Sushi Bar and Grill takes its name from a combo of "Saigon" and "Tokyo," a reflection of the owners' backgrounds. Eventually Vietnamese cuisine will join the menu, but for now it's all Japanese. And there's a varied selection to satisfy palettes that prefer raw or cooked dishes. Friday and Saturday nights are busy but lunch hasn't quite caught on, as we discovered on a weekday visit.

    Despite sounding like a play on the word "psycho", Saikyo Sushi Bar and Grill takes its name from a combo of "Saigon" and "Tokyo," a reflection of the owners' backgrounds. Eventually Vietnamese cuisine will join the menu, but for now it's all Japanese. And there's a varied selection to satisfy palettes that prefer raw or cooked dishes. Friday and Saturday nights are busy but lunch hasn't quite caught on, as we discovered on a weekday visit.

    One of the owners formerly worked as an architect in Vietnam, and his designs have transformed the place impressively from its previous lives. An arched wooden footbridge leads from the parking lot to the front door, and a garden pond is on the way. Inside, the feng shui is enhanced by soft colors, subdued lighting, a small "tatami" seating area and a gleaming sushi bar.

    One of the owners formerly worked as an architect in Vietnam, and his designs have transformed the place impressively from its previous lives. An arched wooden footbridge leads from the parking lot to the front door, and a garden pond is on the way. Inside, the feng shui is enhanced by soft colors, subdued lighting, a small "tatami" seating area and a gleaming sushi bar.

    There is nothing complicated about the menu; it's a to-the-point collection of sashimi (fish served raw) and sushi (vinegared rice garnished with seafood and/or vegetables), with some sukiyaki, teriyaki and tempura entrees thrown in.

    There is nothing complicated about the menu; it's a to-the-point collection of sashimi (fish served raw) and sushi (vinegared rice garnished with seafood and/or vegetables), with some sukiyaki, teriyaki and tempura entrees thrown in.

    Sushi rolls are plumply sliced. The "French roll" ($6.95) is wrapped in a crepe that covers shrimp, crab, avocado, cucumber and cream cheese. Dabbed with tingling wasabi paste, it has a lot of impact. We also loved the crunch of fried soft-shell crab, deliciously blended with asparagus and onions in the "spider roll" ($8.95). Inside there was an unexpected orange blaze of smelt eggs.

    Sushi rolls are plumply sliced. The "French roll" ($6.95) is wrapped in a crepe that covers shrimp, crab, avocado, cucumber and cream cheese. Dabbed with tingling wasabi paste, it has a lot of impact. We also loved the crunch of fried soft-shell crab, deliciously blended with asparagus and onions in the "spider roll" ($8.95). Inside there was an unexpected orange blaze of smelt eggs.

    Tempura fans will find territory to explore in the deep-fried "Sanibel roll" ($6.95) with salmon and asparagus bonded by cream cheese. The vegetable tempura dinner ($8.95) is a filling assortment of sliced sweet potatoes, onions, peppers, broccoli tips and mushrooms. The dish is oily, which weighs down the otherwise light presentation.

    Tempura fans will find territory to explore in the deep-fried "Sanibel roll" ($6.95) with salmon and asparagus bonded by cream cheese. The vegetable tempura dinner ($8.95) is a filling assortment of sliced sweet potatoes, onions, peppers, broccoli tips and mushrooms. The dish is oily, which weighs down the otherwise light presentation.

    Pork teriyaki ($12.95) benefits from the sauce -- light, never clingy -- that's washed over the grilled strips of tenderloin, dusted with sesame seeds. Entrees come with steamed rice and a choice of soup or salad. Go for the miso soup; it's satisfying and aggressive, spiked with scallions and tofu cubes.

    Pork teriyaki ($12.95) benefits from the sauce -- light, never clingy -- that's washed over the grilled strips of tenderloin, dusted with sesame seeds. Entrees come with steamed rice and a choice of soup or salad. Go for the miso soup; it's satisfying and aggressive, spiked with scallions and tofu cubes.

    Service was professionally low-key. We had a sense of space, yet our requests were met in a timely manner. Saikyo Sushi Bar and Grill may just go the distance in a location that's been a revolving door for Asian restaurants.

    If location is everything, Seito Sushi has it made. Located next to the Regal Winter Park Village 20 complex, Seito enjoys a constant flow of theater patrons walking past its long, rectangular dining room. A cynical restaurant owner might use this captive audience as an excuse to serve inferior food. Lord knows the four yuppie rubes who sat next to me, joking about this immaculate and stylish establishment as a "hole in the wall" deserved just that. But wiser minds have prevailed and, instead, Seito turns out sushi every bit as fresh and well-prepared as downtown's longtime favorite Sushi Hatsu.

    Like Sushi Hatsu, Seito bypasses the sometimes challenging culinary aspirations of I-Drive's excellent Hamimasuki to target the casual diner. The menu is brief, focusing on sushi, sashimi and a handful of teriyakis and tempuras -- nothing except wasabi could potentially frighten tastebuds. With the luxury of two visits, my dining partner and I were able to roam Seito's menu. For starters, there's an "octopus salad" ($5.95), a small plate of sashimi-style octopus flavored with a vinegar-soy sauce -- very simple but perfect. Also sampled was a seaweed salad ($4.95), colored a bright relish-green and nicely flavored with lemon sauce.

    Like Sushi Hatsu, Seito bypasses the sometimes challenging culinary aspirations of I-Drive's excellent Hamimasuki to target the casual diner. The menu is brief, focusing on sushi, sashimi and a handful of teriyakis and tempuras -- nothing except wasabi could potentially frighten tastebuds. With the luxury of two visits, my dining partner and I were able to roam Seito's menu. For starters, there's an "octopus salad" ($5.95), a small plate of sashimi-style octopus flavored with a vinegar-soy sauce -- very simple but perfect. Also sampled was a seaweed salad ($4.95), colored a bright relish-green and nicely flavored with lemon sauce.

    Meat fans will enjoy starting with "beef negi maki" ($5.95), thinly sliced sirloin grilled and wrapped around green onions and bean sprouts. Like others on the menu, this dish comes with a garnish of leafy lettuce that seems somewhat out of place.

    Meat fans will enjoy starting with "beef negi maki" ($5.95), thinly sliced sirloin grilled and wrapped around green onions and bean sprouts. Like others on the menu, this dish comes with a garnish of leafy lettuce that seems somewhat out of place.

    Next up, a lovely salmon teriyaki featuring twin fillets in a rich teriyaki sauce, flavored sweetly instead of too salty. Although presented as entrees, these teriyaki dishes should be considered as a side order, for a change of pace during the otherwise all-fish repast.

    Next up, a lovely salmon teriyaki featuring twin fillets in a rich teriyaki sauce, flavored sweetly instead of too salty. Although presented as entrees, these teriyaki dishes should be considered as a side order, for a change of pace during the otherwise all-fish repast.

    Seito's sushi menu offers all the usual suspects prepared with care and presented gracefully. Of special note is a "burduck root and dakuhan roll" ($4.25).The sushi chef couldn't explain "burdock" much past "a tuber," so he handed us a sample of the small, slightly spicy carrotlike root, which produced a wonderfully different texture and taste.

    Seito's sushi menu offers all the usual suspects prepared with care and presented gracefully. Of special note is a "burduck root and dakuhan roll" ($4.25).The sushi chef couldn't explain "burdock" much past "a tuber," so he handed us a sample of the small, slightly spicy carrotlike root, which produced a wonderfully different texture and taste.

    One of Seito's more interesting choices are the "boat combinations," prearranged meals of several items for two to six diners, served in a large wooden boat. We sampled the "love boat" ($34.95) full of teriyaki chicken, seafood and vegetable tempura, and kalbi (beef short ribs), followed by a small plate of a half dozen or so chirashi sushi items and a California roll. Our enjoyment from the "boat" was squashed when it showed up a half hour after ordering with many of the hot items rendered lukewarm.

    One of Seito's more interesting choices are the "boat combinations," prearranged meals of several items for two to six diners, served in a large wooden boat. We sampled the "love boat" ($34.95) full of teriyaki chicken, seafood and vegetable tempura, and kalbi (beef short ribs), followed by a small plate of a half dozen or so chirashi sushi items and a California roll. Our enjoyment from the "boat" was squashed when it showed up a half hour after ordering with many of the hot items rendered lukewarm.

    Other than this oversight, Seito Sushi is easy to recommend and a welcome addition to the sushi scene.

    I'm a lucky guy. What I do for a living doesn't require that I spend long days out in a fishing boat or toiling in the fields. So, unlike the people sushi was originally developed for, I eat it as a luxury.

    That's right, sushi was the original box lunch, with the fermented or vinegared rice -- called "shari" -- the ingredient that preserves the fish without refrigeration. Like most things Japanese, the craft became an art, all of which culminates in the atmosphere of the new Shari Sushi Lounge, full of artistic morsels that delight the eye and the palate.

    That's right, sushi was the original box lunch, with the fermented or vinegared rice -- called "shari" -- the ingredient that preserves the fish without refrigeration. Like most things Japanese, the craft became an art, all of which culminates in the atmosphere of the new Shari Sushi Lounge, full of artistic morsels that delight the eye and the palate.

    This latest restaurant to join the hip habitat of Thornton Park Central makes up in height what it lacks in width, two levels of shimmery chairs and black-clothed tables in a creamy white room. The sushi bar is a chrome and ebony island; the cases of fresh sashimi glimmering under tiny spotlights.

    This latest restaurant to join the hip habitat of Thornton Park Central makes up in height what it lacks in width, two levels of shimmery chairs and black-clothed tables in a creamy white room. The sushi bar is a chrome and ebony island; the cases of fresh sashimi glimmering under tiny spotlights.

    Technically, sushi means the fish part of the delicacy, with the shari having just as much importance as the colorful protein atop it. The fish that landed here are among the best I've tasted, and a combination roll like the "Fort Myers" ($7), with yellowtail and whitefish rolled alongside avocado, scallions and spicy mayo, is a savory showcase. "Beauty and the Beast" ($9) is a knockout, two rolls alternating tuna and eel with avocado, asparagus and flying fish roe -- I don 't know which part is considered the "beast," but this dish is a "beauty."

    Technically, sushi means the fish part of the delicacy, with the shari having just as much importance as the colorful protein atop it. The fish that landed here are among the best I've tasted, and a combination roll like the "Fort Myers" ($7), with yellowtail and whitefish rolled alongside avocado, scallions and spicy mayo, is a savory showcase. "Beauty and the Beast" ($9) is a knockout, two rolls alternating tuna and eel with avocado, asparagus and flying fish roe -- I don 't know which part is considered the "beast," but this dish is a "beauty."

    Simple offerings, such as boiled soybean edamame ($4) or a tako salad of pickled octopus, cucumber, orange slices and spicy kimchee ($7), are done to perfection. More elaborate and original dishes are irresistible. I tried something called "Toro Tartare" ($12) and was served mounds of deep red tuna on top of fried and flaky tortilla wedges; the textures were only surpassed by the taste.

    Simple offerings, such as boiled soybean edamame ($4) or a tako salad of pickled octopus, cucumber, orange slices and spicy kimchee ($7), are done to perfection. More elaborate and original dishes are irresistible. I tried something called "Toro Tartare" ($12) and was served mounds of deep red tuna on top of fried and flaky tortilla wedges; the textures were only surpassed by the taste.

    Behind the silver bar is a cool-looking itamai-san (sushi chef) called Chau ("just Chau," he says). Chau's parents own Saikyo Sushi on Aloma Avenue, which is where some of Shari's inventive menu was tested. It is quite extensive, and I can envision several months worth of regular visits before exhausting the tasty options, but the prize is "Chau's truffles" ($15), an assortment platter that offers ever-changing samples of his remarkable talent. Octopus cupped in a crepe, translucent salmon covered in wasabi-flavored roe, and eel with cucumber thankfully bereft of sweet sauce, were just some of the treasures.

    Behind the silver bar is a cool-looking itamai-san (sushi chef) called Chau ("just Chau," he says). Chau's parents own Saikyo Sushi on Aloma Avenue, which is where some of Shari's inventive menu was tested. It is quite extensive, and I can envision several months worth of regular visits before exhausting the tasty options, but the prize is "Chau's truffles" ($15), an assortment platter that offers ever-changing samples of his remarkable talent. Octopus cupped in a crepe, translucent salmon covered in wasabi-flavored roe, and eel with cucumber thankfully bereft of sweet sauce, were just some of the treasures.

    As sushi chef, manager and co-owner, Chau is responsible for much of Shari's superb quality, and you'll thank him when you leave.

    Shin Sushi strikes a graceful posture on these not-so-mean streets, though the same couldn’t be said about my dining partner and me. We had our fingers tip-deep into the flow of the mesmerizing glass waterwall near the entrance of the restaurant when a bemused maitre d’ caught us wet-handed.

    As we sheepishly followed her to our tatami table, inhaling the new furniture smell and admiring the modern art, one feature seemed slightly off – the lighting. Most of the luminescence filtered through the floor-to-ceiling windows from streetlamps outside, not the stylish fixtures dangling from the high ceiling. The glare cast sharp shadows on tables and polluted the air of elegance, so if I may offer a suggestion: blinds, drapes or shades would not only minimize squinting, but significantly enhance the atmosphere. No matter, we put our blinders on and perused the menu while enjoying a refreshing sakizuke (a Japanese amuse-bouche) of cool shrimp, seaweed and cucumber dressed in a vinegary miso sauce, and a tastebud-tickling salad served in a glass tumbler.

    Our gracious and well-informed waitress recommended the couples combination ($49) comprising 12 pieces of nigiri and 16 pieces of sashimi of the chef’s choosing, along with a spider roll and a spicy tuna roll, all served on a driftwood-like slab. There’s plenty here for two, and the selection reflects the restaurant’s commitment to sourcing and the chefs’ flair for artistry, without belying tradition. Of note: ultra-fresh and fatty flounder sashimi served in an oyster shell; intense silver-skinned mackerel nigiri; lubricious, gleaming white escolar; the rich sweet essence of unagi; the sticky rice and tempura flakes of spicy tuna rolls; and the panko-fried crab in the spider roll. Even eggy tamago was deftly executed. Conversely, shaved onions interfered with the taste of the salmon nigiri; the whelk, while shaped like an orchid, felt like a rubber plant; and octopus nigiri proved too tough (and too intelligent, as my dining companion remarked) to eat. Still, the dish as a whole is a rewarding sampling of what’s offered, and ideal for those who enjoy their sushi relatively unadulterated, though a number of signature and maki rolls are also offered.

    Starters were equally rewarding, and I couldn’t get enough of wonderfully flavorful tataki beef ($8). Thin slices of marbled raw beef circularly arranged atop cucumber shavings came garnished with raw garlic, minced ginger and shaved onions. Tart ponzu had us blissfully double-dipping and fighting for the last slice of beef. Cucumber-seaweed salad ($5), though conservatively portioned, was big on freshness, with julienned cucumber intermingling with softened wakame seaweed; a rice vinegar dressing provided an astringent finish. Edamame ($4) were perfectly steamed and salted, but that didn’t stop me from repeatedly squeezing the ears of the rabbit-shaped sea salt grinder.

    The batter of the banana tempura was just right (not too crispy, not too soggy) and, along with two scoops of red bean ice cream, made a winner of the tropical sundae ($7). Fried ice cream ($6) failed texturally, as the tempura shells were ultimately reduced to mush.

    It’s somewhat of a surprise that Shin hasn’t quite been “discovered” yet, especially given its proximity to trendy Citrus next door. Sure, there’s been some tinkering with the menu and décor over the past three months, but if you ask me, I think it’s entirely plausible that patrons walking past have been blinded by the light.

    Except for the music, we liked almost everything about Sushi House, which is so tiny it might as well be called Sushi Nook. Please, please, we silently begged through an otherwise fine dinner, make someone turn off the Japanese pop versions of Kylie Minogue and Devo tunes.

    But if you can stomach peppy music with indecipherable lyrics, the rest is highly palatable. The sushi is luscious and ocean fresh. Team some Kirin beer with the natural resources for a satisfying combination that we enjoyed on our visit.

    But if you can stomach peppy music with indecipherable lyrics, the rest is highly palatable. The sushi is luscious and ocean fresh. Team some Kirin beer with the natural resources for a satisfying combination that we enjoyed on our visit.

    Sushi House is unassuming in contrast to its high-profile neighbor, the Outback Steakhouse. Both are in a shopping "island" on the outer fringes of the Florida Mall property. The steak aromas were tantalizing as we made our way through the parking lot. But we got over any temptations once we stepped inside Sushi House. There we found a microcosm of delicate colors and culinary simplicity, based on a menu of sushi, sashimi, teriyaki and traditional Japanese (soba) noodle dishes.

    Sushi House is unassuming in contrast to its high-profile neighbor, the Outback Steakhouse. Both are in a shopping "island" on the outer fringes of the Florida Mall property. The steak aromas were tantalizing as we made our way through the parking lot. But we got over any temptations once we stepped inside Sushi House. There we found a microcosm of delicate colors and culinary simplicity, based on a menu of sushi, sashimi, teriyaki and traditional Japanese (soba) noodle dishes.

    Oddly, the waitress left only one menu at our table. We tried sharing, but then my friend got another one from the vacant hostess station. When the waitress came to take our orders, my friend said he was leaning toward the "sushi deluxe" sampler entree ($16.95), but we needed a few more minutes to decide.

    Oddly, the waitress left only one menu at our table. We tried sharing, but then my friend got another one from the vacant hostess station. When the waitress came to take our orders, my friend said he was leaning toward the "sushi deluxe" sampler entree ($16.95), but we needed a few more minutes to decide.

    About 10 minutes later, the waitress delivered the "sushi deluxe" to my guest and asked if I had decided on an entree. This was strange, but I went ahead and placed my order. Then we shared his entree as an appetizer while we waited for the rest of the food. The sampler was an extensive collection of California rolls combined with a dozen varieties of tuna, yellowtail, whitefish, octopus, crab, smelt roe and more. All of the preparations were exquisite and fresh.

    About 10 minutes later, the waitress delivered the "sushi deluxe" to my guest and asked if I had decided on an entree. This was strange, but I went ahead and placed my order. Then we shared his entree as an appetizer while we waited for the rest of the food. The sampler was an extensive collection of California rolls combined with a dozen varieties of tuna, yellowtail, whitefish, octopus, crab, smelt roe and more. All of the preparations were exquisite and fresh.

    About 15 minutes later, out came my tempura seafood combination ($14.95), a delicately battered and fried collection of tuna, salmon, yellowtail, scallops and shrimp. We also savored the sushi made with grilled teriyaki pork ($3.75). And among dozens of choices for sushi a la carte, we particularly liked the "dragon roll," a rich taste of eel, avocado, roe and cucumber ($7.50).

    About 15 minutes later, out came my tempura seafood combination ($14.95), a delicately battered and fried collection of tuna, salmon, yellowtail, scallops and shrimp. We also savored the sushi made with grilled teriyaki pork ($3.75). And among dozens of choices for sushi a la carte, we particularly liked the "dragon roll," a rich taste of eel, avocado, roe and cucumber ($7.50).

    Despite the cheesy pop music and the service mistake, we'll return to sample more of the menu the next time we're in the area. Among the crop of small, family-owned Japanese restaurants near the south Trail, the cuisine at the Sushi House holds its own and then some.

    Don't let the fuchsia hues and J-pop-themed decor fool you ' Sushi Pop takes its fare seriously. Stellar sushi and sashimi complement a variety of rolls, entrees and whimsical desserts flourished with notes of molecular gastronomy (blue cheese powder or liquid nitrogen sorbet, anyone?). Sake fans have the privilege of consulting an in-house expert.

    We all shed a wasabi-tinged tear when Oyaji shut its doors after more than a decade of serving some of the finest sushi in the city. Its hidden-gem status lent further cause among sushi cognoscenti, not to mention the contingent of Japanese patrons, to keep their fishy yaps shut when it came to spreading the word about the place.

    But dry your weary eyes and prick up your ears, dear readers, because Ochiai Hidehiko, head blade at Sushi Tomi, is poised to step into the role relinquished by Takashi Hayakawa. So Sushi Tomi's digs are about as inviting as a badly lit basement apartment and its proximity to a Super Wal-Mart doesn't exactly entice ' such annoyances don't seem to bother diners here, a good number of whom, I'm happy to report, are of Japanese descent. You'll hear murmurs of 'Ita-dakimasu,â?� the pre-meal Japanese utterance akin to saying grace, followed by cries of 'Oishi!â?� (delicious!), thanks to the healthy sampling of sushi and authentic Japanese fare offered.

    Having been denied the pleasure of nibbling on gyoza ($4), those delectable little potstickers they had just run out of, we opted for the gyu tataki ($8.50) instead ' buttery soft slices of rare beef dressed with scallions and sparked with lemony ponzu. Suffice it to say, the Lucky Cat atop the sushi bar shone a little culinary beneficence on us. I wish I could say the same for the overly pasty sweet purple potato tempura ($4.50) and the small bowl of soggy edamame ($3.50), but the sushi is what people come here for, and in that respect Hidehiko, former head chef at Ran-Getsu on I-Drive, doesn't disappoint.

    His sunshine roll ($9.50) was described as 'a mouthful of awesomeâ?� by my dining partner, and I couldn't have agreed more. The colorfully impressive bundle of tuna, salmon, yellowtail and whitefish rolled in a wheel of crunchy cucumber made an emphatic impression ' it was certainly one of the finer rolls I've sampled in the city. Aesthetics played a part in the samurai roll ($9.75) as well, the soft shell of avocado molded atop spicy tuna being a must for those who like a little fire with their flair.

    My favorite was the impeccably carved fatty tuna nigiri (market price) which felt like foie gras on the palate. I could've downed a dozen of these toro alone ' a prospect I'm seriously considering on my next visit. Sesame overwhelmed the well-formed cherry dragon roll ($10.95), but the mix of eel, tuna, cucumber and spicy mayo created a warm and delicate balance of flavors.

    While the maraschino cherry and whipped cream were superfluous embellishments to the red bean ice cream ($3.50), the icy treat's essence is just what you want in your mouth when walking out the door. Partly frozen, partly creamy tempura cheesecake ($4.75) was marred by inconsistent texture and temperature, and left me with an undesirable heaviness antithetical to the typical sushi-going experience. Then again, from the kind and charming staff and the reasonable prices to the hideously colored walls and the exceptional rolls fashioned by chef Hidehiko, Sushi Tomi is anything but typical.

    Of late, there's been much to-do made about extravagant sushi experiences in big cities for which diners shell out $350 or more – per person! Is it worth it? Many say yes, and it's all about the quality of the ingredients. Fresh ingredients. After all, those tasty Japanese sculptures we've come to know and love are simply formed from perfectly cooked rice and raw fish – the rest is culinary magic.

    While elitists are willing to climb the price ladder in search of the very best, chef Norihito Shimooka has appealed to sushi lovers at the other end of the cost spectrum. At his Sushiology, a hole-in-the-wall operation behind a mega gift store on I-Drive – the drag that's famous around the world for its bargains – nothing on the menu is more than $6.50.

    Shimooka is a native of Tokyo and worked as a sushi chef in Japan for about 10 years before migrating to Miami, where he worked for another decade. Last year, the chef headed here to open what he hopes will become the flagship in his sushi enterprise. With modern orange accents, the worn-in establishment is set up for takeout and delivery, though you can grab one of the tables (three inside, two outside). Were it more polished, Sushiology could become a tasteful chain – kind of a Starbucks for sushi. As it is, this is not a place to sit and linger, but it's comfortable enough to wait for a to-go order or dine quickly before dashing off to Wet 'n Wild or whatever else lures people to this touristy part of town.

    There are no surprises at Sushiology, just familiar flavors put together faster and cheaper for a respectable result. So even if the rice was a tad stale and dry, as if it had been pre-rolled and left to sit for a while, what can you expect for this kind of money?

    My study of Sushiology began with seaweed salad ($3.25), a mix of bright-green wakame seaweed tossed in a light dressing of sesame oil and rice wine vinegar. Their edamame ($2.75) were exceptionally satisfying – the pale green pods were tender with the slightest resistance of crunch, and salt crystals were speckled over the top.

    In the cooked department, the gyu don ($5.50) turned out to be a hot, hearty bowl of thin-sliced beef over rice that kept me asking for more. The chicken teriyaki adaptation of the same ($5) was almost as pleasing, though the chicken was dry and there was too much sweet teriyaki sauce.

    Not so pleasing was the bland tuna tataki ($5.50) – pieces of ginger and scallion scattered among ruby-red hunks of raw tuna – a dish that lacked character as a whole. (And do be aware that the bright red color of the tuna is actually produced artificially by pumping the meat full of carbon monoxide.)

    The rolls at Sushiology are another story: A great value for the quality, most are priced in the $3.50 range. The California roll ($3) rivals the better grocery-store varieties, and maybe even comes out ahead. My favorite was the vegetarian roll ($4) with cool cucumbers, avocado, sweet carrot, spinach and pickled gourd. Another winner was the rather unsophisticated volcano ($6.50), a California roll topped with a baked scallop and heavily drenched with a thick mayonnaise sauce.

    Eating at Sushiology was a lesson in the range of quality, quantity and price that sushi restaurants can span. I'm not giving up my aspirations to someday whisk myself off to New York City for an obscenely priced epiphany at five-star Masa, but maybe I'll get there sooner by saving money on this low-dollar sushi outlet.

Calendar

Newsletters

Never miss a beat

Sign Up Now

Subscribe now to get the latest news delivered right to your inbox.

© 2019 Orlando Weekly

Website powered by Foundation