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    We didn't review this location but you can check out the review of Marble Slab in Winter Park.

    The Greek island of Mykonos is located in the Aegean Sea. Its curving streets -- designed to confuse attacking pirates in the 16th century -- are today lined with restaurants that helped define it as a vacation mecca. Now a slice of Mykonos has come to us in the form of Mayerion Mykonos, a small, pumped-up bistro in Longwood, owned and operated by Dimitrios Salivaras. The menu offers generations of family recipes from the old country.

    We were greeted at the door by a chipper gentleman who told us in a thick Mediterranean accent that his name was Nick, and that he was born in Greece in 1924 -- all before offering us complimentary glasses of dry, red wine while we waited for a table. Waits are typical here; the restaurant seats just 65. But the narrow space has been creatively transformed with high, beamed ceilings and stunning Mediterranean art. The bustling, open-air kitchen -- the "mayerion" -- adds excitement. Just about everyone gets to watch and listen as chefs whip up a fast-paced production of flavors, aromas and textures.

    We started with melitzanosalata ($4.95), a glistening spread of chunky roasted eggplant blended with red wine and olive oil, and liberally anointed with garlic. While we loved it, we wished there was something to pair it with other than thick-sliced whole-grain bread. Pita wedges would have been more appropriate.

    Much more impressive was thallasina skaras ($14.95), a succulent, smoky flavored charbroiled trio of shrimp, octopus and calamari, finished with a crisp lemon vinaigrette.

    Although there are plenty of ethnic traditions, such as moussaka, on the menu, it's a good idea to explore the daily specials, sometimes tweaked slightly to accent the freshest available ingredients. "Grouper Mykonos" ($16.95) is not to be missed: The 14-ounce fillet of domestic black grouper was topped with a luscious melange of tomatoes, caramelized onions, celery, white wine and fresh herbs. Feta cheese was crumbled on top, and the fillet was broiled to a golden brown. Another attraction: a thick salmon fillet wrapped in layers of phyllo pastry ($16.95), baked to a delicate crisp and topped by mild sauce of lemon, dill and white wine with a hint of chopped onions.

    Our expedition culminated with a complimentary treat: The waiter brought out a plate of fresh apple wedges drizzled with honey and cinnamon. It was surprising that something so simple could be so elegant and delicious -- the key was in the sun-ripened apples. In comparison, it was an off night for the soggy baklava ($1.50).

    Throughout dinner, there was total attention and concern from the wait staff. Everything we ordered came in such generous portions that our to-go boxes quickly stacked up. But not to worry. This food did not go to waste.

    Fondue was the craze when I was in college in the '70s. Though we couldn't afford it very often, it was our favorite way to celebrate special occasions. While price isn't the issue anymore, I still reserve fondue for special evenings. Such was the case when I recently visited The Melting Pot in Longwood, the new sister location to the popular Maitland restaurant that's operated for 20 years. This was to be an adventure for my vacationing brother.

    Wood paneling, exposed beams and greenery create a more contemporary look than at the original restaurant. And yet booths, tabletop candles and overhead lights crafted from wine bottles still create a relaxed, intimate setting.

    Wood paneling, exposed beams and greenery create a more contemporary look than at the original restaurant. And yet booths, tabletop candles and overhead lights crafted from wine bottles still create a relaxed, intimate setting.

    Entrees include seafood, beef, chicken and vegetarian options, prepared in either cholesterol-free peanut oil or in a less traditional "court bouillon" seasoned broth that was low in salt and fat as well as cholesterol-free. Each entree comes with mushroom or chef's salad.

    Entrees include seafood, beef, chicken and vegetarian options, prepared in either cholesterol-free peanut oil or in a less traditional "court bouillon" seasoned broth that was low in salt and fat as well as cholesterol-free. Each entree comes with mushroom or chef's salad.

    We chose the combination fondue for two ($32.90), which features a cheese fondue appetizer, salad and an entree potpourri -- filet mignon, chicken, shrimp, teriyaki sirloin, mahi-mahi and veggies.

    We chose the combination fondue for two ($32.90), which features a cheese fondue appetizer, salad and an entree potpourri -- filet mignon, chicken, shrimp, teriyaki sirloin, mahi-mahi and veggies.

    We began with the "fiesta" cheese starter, a variation on the cheddar and Swiss offerings. It arrived with a basket of French, pumpernickel and rye breads, as well as tortilla chips that replaced the standard fruit and vegetable medley. Our server melted Swiss and sharp cheddar cheeses with domestic beer and onions, throwing in garlic and mild salsa for good measure. (Peppers were left on the side.) The resulting concoction was enjoyable though not especially spicy.

    We began with the "fiesta" cheese starter, a variation on the cheddar and Swiss offerings. It arrived with a basket of French, pumpernickel and rye breads, as well as tortilla chips that replaced the standard fruit and vegetable medley. Our server melted Swiss and sharp cheddar cheeses with domestic beer and onions, throwing in garlic and mild salsa for good measure. (Peppers were left on the side.) The resulting concoction was enjoyable though not especially spicy.

    My generous salad -- a bed of lettuce topped with a layer of mushrooms and a handful of alfalfa sprouts, coated with a zesty Italian dressing -- was heavenly. My brother's chef salad was a nice collection of fresh greens, cucumbers, Emmentaler cheese, hard-boiled egg, tomatoes and smoky ham. The house sweet-and-sour dressing was a nice departure from the norm.

    My generous salad -- a bed of lettuce topped with a layer of mushrooms and a handful of alfalfa sprouts, coated with a zesty Italian dressing -- was heavenly. My brother's chef salad was a nice collection of fresh greens, cucumbers, Emmentaler cheese, hard-boiled egg, tomatoes and smoky ham. The house sweet-and-sour dressing was a nice departure from the norm.

    When the entree platter arrived, our server rattled off its contents, the names of the two batters (sesame seed and tempura), the seven accompanying dressings and sauces, plus suggestions for mixing and matching combinations. As it was impossible to digest all this info at once, we experimented with only a few resulting gaffes and a couple of innovations. Try stuffing the mushroom caps with green goddess dressing, then dipping it in sesame-seed batter. It looks disgusting, but it's delicious. And the curry, cocktail and sweet-and-sour sauces are terrific.

    When the entree platter arrived, our server rattled off its contents, the names of the two batters (sesame seed and tempura), the seven accompanying dressings and sauces, plus suggestions for mixing and matching combinations. As it was impossible to digest all this info at once, we experimented with only a few resulting gaffes and a couple of innovations. Try stuffing the mushroom caps with green goddess dressing, then dipping it in sesame-seed batter. It looks disgusting, but it's delicious. And the curry, cocktail and sweet-and-sour sauces are terrific.

    For dessert we splurged on a rich, raspberry-milk chocolate fondue ($6.50 for two) that was served with thin squares of cheesecake and pound cake, plus a refreshing plate of fruits.

    For dessert we splurged on a rich, raspberry-milk chocolate fondue ($6.50 for two) that was served with thin squares of cheesecake and pound cake, plus a refreshing plate of fruits.

    Throughout our culinary adventure, we found our server to be bubbly and knowledgeable, and we especially liked the way the manager assisted with service when his staff were busy elsewhere.

    Indian food in Orlando hasn't attained the levels of sophistication found in larger cities where chefs are challenged to test the boundaries of 'ethnicâ?� cuisine. So until that day comes, we'll settle for the usual standards of Indo-Pak fare, and there's nothing wrong with that. Having grown up on Indian cooking, I make it a point to seek a derivative of mom's kitchen at least once a week. Seminole County isn't the first place I'd look, but the area is home to a large number of South Asians, so selecting Lake Mary as the site for Memories of India, the Sequel, is hardly surprising. What is surprising is that I found the overall experience here to be as good, if not better, than at the venerable Memories of India in the Bay Hill Plaza. The fact that chef-owner Jackoswald Philip left to man the satellite kitchen in Lake Mary has something to do with it, but I was also impressed by the genuinely gracious wait staff, and their perceptive recognition of the line between obligingly attentive and unbearably obsequious.

    There's no shame, however, in fawning over a cup of masala tea ($3.75), a popular après-meal beverage that'll rouse the appetite just the same. Crispy bites of pappadums prep palates for the spiced affair to come, as will lifting the lids off the containers in the relish tray. Chutneys and pickled condiments are necessary adjuncts to Indian cuisine and allow flavors to run wild ' a mouthful of rice and curry without pickled carrots, mango or green chilies thrown in the mix is gastronomic suffocation, in my opinion. Hence, dipping liberally into the mint and tamarind chutneys augmented the essence of items presented in the nawabi lukme appetizer plate ($12.50): insipid green-pepper pakoras and crumbly-shelled samosas, in particular, really needed it; silken lamb seekh kebab was made all the better with a tamarind splash; while juicy red morsels of chicken tikka are flawless as they were.

    Mains draw inspiration from all over the Indian subcontinent with, commendably, little to no temperance for Western palates. Green chilies and crushed peppercorns provided the bass note to lamb shakuti's ($14.95) fragrantly lavish sauce, each meaty chunk sweetened with the essence of roasted coconut. A few bites of carrot pickle worked wonders for the Goan specialty, as did a side of unleavened goodness ' superlative aloo paratha ($3.50), glistening with ghee and stuffed with seasoned potatoes and peas, is one of a dozen tandoor-baked breads offered. The sly heat of crushed pepper greeted me in the chicken kali murch ($14), a saucy number gorgeously streaked with paneer and textured with bell peppers.

    The token wine-and-beer list does little to complement your meal, but desserts are necessary to complete it. Creamy, rich kulfi ($4.25) is a palliative pistachio ice, though neophytes may be put off by the waxy finish. The gulab jamun ($3.95), my favorite South Indian sweet, was as good as I've had anywhere on the continent. Take your sweet time with the syrup-soaked cheese balls, and be sure to have them warmed before biting in ' the finish is guaranteed to be memorable.

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