12 new Florida laws that you probably don't know about, but you should

On July 1st, 130 new Florida laws for 2015 will take effect. That's a lot. So, here's 12 we think should be on your radar. However, if you want to read the full list of dos and don'ts, check em all out here.

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Pregnancy:The state now makes it a violation of its civil rights law to discriminate against pregnant women when it comes to food-service, housing, accommodations or employment.
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Craft distillery law:This new law increases the amount of liquor you can buy on-site at a craft distillery. Beginning July 1, customers can purchase no more than: "A. Two individual containers of each branded product; B. Three individual containers of a single branded product and up to one individual container of a second branded product; or C. Four individual containers of a single branded product." The old law stated that you couldn't buy more than two bottles of craft spirits from a distillery at any one time.
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Stray livestock:Who knew we didn't have laws on the books that efficiently handled stray goats, sheep, chickens and other livestock? Starting July 1, "the sheriff or the county animal control center may offer for adoption or humanely dispose of stray livestock, excluding cattle. If the livestock is to be offered for adoption or humanely disposed of, the sheriff or the county animal control center shall: a) Provide written notice to the owner, if known, advising the owner of the location where the livestock is impounded and of the amount due by reason of the impounding, and that unless the livestock is redeemed within a timeframe to be established by the sheriff or the county animal control center, which shall be a period of at least 3 business days, the livestock will be offered for adoption or humanely disposed of; or b) If the owner is unknown or cannot be located, obtain service upon the owner by publishing a notice on the sheriff’s or the county animal control center’s website. If the livestock is not redeemed within a timeframe to be established by the authorized agency, which shall be a period of at least 3 business days, the livestock will be offered for adoption or humanely disposed of."
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The All American Flag Act requires that "when the state, a county, or a municipality purchases a United States flag or a state flag for public use, the flag must be made in the United States from articles, materials, or supplies, all of which are grown, produced, and manufactured in the United States." Even though this law goes into effect July 1, it only applies to the purchase of a flag on or after Jan. 1, 2016.
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Liability protection for farmers:If you're a farmer who's trying to do a good thing by allowing people to come to your property and collect unharvested fruits and vegetables for free, you're no long liable if somebody gets hurt on your property. Unless that injury was due to your own gross negligence. The state's not letting you off the hook for that.
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Hey, kids, you don't need your parents permission to skateboard, freestyle or inline skate at the city skatepark anymore! You do, however, still need their permission to play paintball or mountain bike.
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Online voting registration:This is another one that gets put on the books now, but doesn't affect Floridians right away. It states that beginning on Oct. 1, 2017, people can submit their voter registration applications online. 
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Online voting registration:This is another one that gets put on the books now, but doesn't affect Floridians right away. It states that beginning on Oct. 1, 2017, people can submit their voter registration applications online.
Photo via iStock
Surveillance by a drone: If you somehow have access to a drone, you can't use it to take photos of private property without consent of the property owner. "A person is presumed to have a reasonable expectation of privacy on his or her privately owned real property if he or she is not observable by persons located at ground level in a place where they have a legal right to be, regardless of whether he or she is observable from the air with the use of a drone. … EXCEPTIONS.—This section act does not prohibit the use of a drone: a) To counter a high risk of a terrorist attack by a specific individual or organization if the United States Secretary of Homeland Security determines that credible intelligence indicates that there is such a risk."
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HIV testing:It used to be that you had to give informed consent in order for doctors, nurses or health-care practitioners to test you for HIV. According to this new law, as long as you're in a "health-care setting," Per the law: "The person to be tested shall be notified orally or in writing that the test is planned and that he or she has the right to decline the test. If the person to be tested declines the test, such decision shall be documented in the medical record. A person who has signed a general consent form for medical care is not required to sign or otherwise provide a separate consent for an HIV test during the period in which the general consent form is in effect."
Photo via medscape.com
No more fake service animals: If you pretend your dog, cat, pony, helper monkey, etc. is a service animal, but somebody founds out you're faking it, there's now a law on the books that'll slap you with penalties for being a lying liar. Also, if your service animal acts up in a public place, you can be asked to leave; and even though a public accommodation can't ask you about the nature of your disability, "to determine the difference between a service animal and a pet, a public accommodation may ask if an animal is a service animal required because of a disability and what work the animal has been trained to perform."
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Body Cameras: This one seems to defy the purpose of body cameras in the first place. It allows contents of body cameras worn by law enforcement officers to "remain confidential and exempt from public records requirements under certain circumstances." Any body camera videos made in a private residence, in a health-care or social services facility, or "taken in a place that a reasonable person would expect to be private" are exempt from public-records laws. "People who know they are being recorded by a body camera may be unwilling to cooperate fully with law enforcement officers if they know that a body camera recording can be made publicly available to anyone else," the law states. "People may also be less likely to call a law enforcement agency for services if their sensitive personal information or the circumstances that necessitate a law enforcement agency’s involvement are subject to public dissemination as a body camera recording used for criminal purposes if they were available upon request. This exemption from public records requirements allows law enforcement officers to more effectively and efficiently administer their duties."
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Body Cameras: This one seems to defy the purpose of body cameras in the first place. It allows contents of body cameras worn by law enforcement officers to "remain confidential and exempt from public records requirements under certain circumstances." Any body camera videos made in a private residence, in a health-care or social services facility, or "taken in a place that a reasonable person would expect to be private" are exempt from public-records laws. "People who know they are being recorded by a body camera may be unwilling to cooperate fully with law enforcement officers if they know that a body camera recording can be made publicly available to anyone else," the law states. "People may also be less likely to call a law enforcement agency for services if their sensitive personal information or the circumstances that necessitate a law enforcement agency’s involvement are subject to public dissemination as a body camera recording used for criminal purposes if they were available upon request. This exemption from public records requirements allows law enforcement officers to more effectively and efficiently administer their duties."
Photo via washingtontimes.com