Friday, September 20, 2019

Florida's minimum-wage amendment tops 700,000 signatures

Posted By on Fri, Sep 20, 2019 at 8:35 PM

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A constitutional amendment that would increase Florida's minimum wage has submitted more than 700,000 petition signatures to the state of Florida.

Florida For A Fair Wage, an initiative chaired and bankrolled by Orlando-based attorney John Morgan, has submitted 705,920 valid signatures as of Wednesday. If passed, the amendment will increase the state's minimum wage to $10 an hour on Sept. 30, 2021 and increase it by $1 every year until Sept. 30, 2026. 

According to the Financial Impact Estimating Conference, a hike in minimum wage would cost the state of Florida roughly $540 million by the end of 2027

In order to be eligible for the November 2020 ballot, the petition must reach 766,200 valid signatures by the February deadline. Also, the Florida Supreme Court must sign of the on the proposed ballots' wording, in order for the amendment to be approved. The state's current minimum wage is set at $8.46 an hour.



Central Florida residents working minimum wage are already facing an uphill battle in affording basic housing.

Meanwhile, the political committee known as All Voters Vote has tallied 664, 983 petition signatures to update the primary-election system in the state of Florida. Currently, Florida uses a "closed" primary system that only allows voters registered under certain parties to participate in those party's primaries. The proposed amendment would allow all registered voters to cast ballots in the primaries regardless of political affiliation. The two candidates who receive the most votes in each primary advance to the general election.

Another political committee known as Florida Citizen Voters has already topped the 766,200-signature threshold to change part of the state Constitution that says, “Every citizen of the United States who is at least eighteen years of age and who is a permanent resident of the state, if registered as provided by law, shall be an elector of the county where registered.”

The proposal would change that wording to: “Only a citizen of the United States who is at least eighteen years of age and who is a permanent resident of the state, if registered as provided by law, shall be an elector of the county where registered.” The committee still needs Supreme Court approval to officially alter the wording in the constitution.

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