The middle-class implosion 

One day, one newspaper, one page. The day was Nov. 12, the paper was The New York Times, the page was C4. The issue was jobs. Or the lack thereof.;;While the Powers That Be keep pretending that there's nothing but "Boom Times" in our land, most Americans are asking, "a boom for whom?" Eight out of 10 of us have lost income during the past five years, despite the claims that these have been years of unprecedented prosperity.;;Yes, there has been terrific worker productivity, and working folks have generated a tidal wave of new wealth. But the gains produced by the many have been hijacked by the few.;;On this page were reports of a single day's worth of downsizings, starting with Kemet Corporation, a South Carolina electronics company that announced it was moving 1,000 jobs to Mexico. Federal-Mogul, an auto parts manufacturer in Michigan, announced that it was closing 13 service centers and eliminating those jobs. Likewise Petrie Retail Inc. announced it would close 96 of its women's clothing stores and dismiss its employees. Donna Karen, the seller of high-dollar fashions, announced this same day that it would cut 15 percent of its workforce to jack up its stock price. ;;And Waste Management Inc., the nation's largest garbage collector, announced it was cutting 1,200 employees. Another story announced that underwear maker Fruit of the Loom would shed 2,900 jobs, completing its drive to move all of its sewing operations to Mexico. The headline story on page C4, though, went to Kodak, which announced new cuts of 10,000 jobs -- bringing its total job elimination this decade to more than 55,000.;;From underwear to garbage, electronics to;film, the "boom" you hear in our economy is really the implosion of the middle class.

Speaking of Jim Hightower

More by Jim Hightower


Never miss a beat

Sign Up Now

Subscribe now to get the latest news delivered right to your inbox.


© 2016 Orlando Weekly

Website powered by Foundation