Letters 


Creative history

Thanks for the review of Al Lewis' creative take on his own history `"Fang versus fiction," Feb. 16`. There was a Batman comic story in which The Joker said, "If I'm going to have a past I prefer that it be multiple choice." Al seems to have embraced this philosophy. It's one of the reasons we loved him so much. I hope you don't mind if I post your article on some genre fan boards.

Mike Acord, via the Internet

Won't fit on a business card

In response to L. Klein's pointless rant about the right not protesting `Letters, Feb. 16`, you forgot to mention your protest group: the "let's-become-a-socialist-national-and-spread-our-butt-cheeks-for-any-idiot-that-wants-a-free-handout-or-any-nation-that-hates-us-but-gleefully-accepts-our-foreign-aid-celebrity-worshipping-politically-correct-douche-bags-who-are-actually-stupid-enough-to-believe-Hillary-would-make-a-decent-president" group. Your lame-ass group doesn't even deserve a grade, just barely an "incomplete."

Scott C., via the Internet

Word

`Jason Ferguson:` Thanks for putting the writing on the wall with this week's column `Notable Noise, Feb. 16`. And yes, fuck them.

Bao Le-Huu, Orlando

A dog's life

Disney paints their usual perfect picture in the movie 8 Below. It portrays a musher who risks his life to save his sled dogs lost in a snowstorm. This is far from the reality of the Iditarod race, which will kick off March 4th in Alaska. About 1,500 dogs start the race, but more than one-third are flown out every year because they become sick, injured or exhausted from the grueling race itself. The race distance is equivalent to traveling from Orlando to New York, only in blinding snowstorms and vicious terrain.

Thousands of dogs are bred to run in the Iditarod, but not every puppy is born a fast runner. In order to see which ones are good at pulling, mushers put the puppies in harness. Others hook them right up to sleds; while still others have the dogs drag logs, tires or other heavy objects around.

Those who do not make the grade are usually killed by bludgeoning, drowning or shooting. Most dogs left after the cull live in cramped kennels that are usually not inspected by any regulatory agency. Kennel operators often keep dogs tethered on short ropes or chains or confined in tiny spaces.

The Iditarod brings in tourists, generating millions of dollars for Alaska each year, and as we all know, any time people are making money off the backs of animals it can never be a good thing. In the Iditarod's case, man's best friend is thought of as nothing more than a snowmobile with fur that will bring in a fat check for a greedy musher. March madness indeed!

Carla Wilson, Winter Springs

Do something

Your last installment on homelessness `"Dear Buddy," Feb. 2`, which I read earlier today, is a necessary indictment of our city leaders for virtually turning a deaf ear to the resolution of this growing problem. The virtual absence of affordable housing is just one case in point. There are many others. Other cities, such as Miami and Seattle, are doing a lot more than Orlando.

John Scolaro, Orlando

On the beat

I wanted to write to express how much I'm enjoying the work of your new writer of Police Beat, Issac Stolzenbach. Keep up the great work! The homeless feature has also been excellent.

Rachel Newcomb, Winter Park

letters@orlandoweekly.com

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